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(11) Patent Number: KE 116
(45) Date of grant: 10/03/2005

(12) PATENT
 
(51) Int.Cl.2: G 09D 3/04
(21) Application Number: 1997/ 000205
(22) Filing Date: 09/05/1997
 
(73) Owner:ONYANGO OLAL CHARLES RICHARD of, P.O.Box 290 NGIYA, Kenya
(72) Inventor:ONYANGO OLAL & CHARLES RICHARD
 
(54) Title: ALL TIME CALENDER.
(57) Abstract:
The invention relates to an all-timecalendar made of hard and durable material, that shows the calendar of the whole year.
 
ALL TIME CALENDAR
The invention relates to a calendar made of hard durable material like wood,
metal, plastic etc. The commonest calendars that are found in many houses are
made of paper. Other common calendars aremade of cloth, carton or polythene.

The all-time calendar will be useful for all years. It is based on the fact that every year has twelve months, January to December and every week has seven days, Monday to Sunday.
According to the invention the months are indicated on plates (3) which are fixed to the main frame (1) both of fig 1. The days are indicated on plates (4) which are also fixed to the main frame(1) of fig 1.The Months appear in rows while the days appear in columns. (It is also possible to have the Months in columns and days in rows). The dates are indicated on the movable plates (5), fig 1, which can be moved vertically or horizontally beneath supports (11, 12, 13), of fig 6, fixed to the main frame (1). In one piece of the movable plates (5), the dates appear in the order 1, 8,15,22,29 after which there is some space before the dates of the subsequent month.
In the other movable plate, the dates appear as 2, 9,16,23,30 after which there is some space before the dates of the subsequent month as mentioned earlier.

To cater for leap years, January and February are separated from the rest of the
year. Consequently, there is an alternative plate (9), fig 5, that shows the 29th
day of February. To set the calendar for a particular year, one needs to know the30 day of 1st January of that year. The movable plate (5) with 1 at the beginning is then placed in line with the day of 1st January. The movable plate with 2 at the beginning is placed in line with the next day and that with 3 at the beginning follows. The pattern continues for the rest of the days until the plate with 7 at the beginning is in line with the day before 1st of January.
The arrangement is such that the numbers increase as one goes down a column and every new month begins in a new column. Further, if it is a leap year, then the alternative plate (9), fig 5, with 29thday of February is used.
Another aspect of the invention is that the dates of January and February are
numbered on seven movable plates with the eighth one as an alternative used
only once after four years, i.e. during leap years. For the rest of the months(March to December) the dates appear on 14 plates. The first seven plates for dates of March to July and the next seven plates for dates of the months of August to December. The two sets are exactly alike in features. It is also possible to let March to December appear in the same row and therefore use seven plates only.
To arrange for March to July one should check the last day of February from the part already set and subsequently tell the first day of March. The Movable plate designed with the first day of March is placed in line with this particular day.
The invention enables the dates to appear in their positions automatically as long as the first seven dates of March have been arranged.
To arrange for August to December, one should check the last day of July from the part already set and then place the plate with 1st of August in line with the day of that date. Arranging, for the next six dates of August enables the rest of the dates to fit in their positions automatically.
Having set the calendar for a particular year, the calendar for the subsequent year can be obtained without dismantling the whole set-up. For a non-leap year that follows a leap year, the dates appear one day after the days of the same dates of the previous year as in fig 2 and fig 3. (It is well known that 365 days equal 52 weeks and 1 day). First the movable plates (6) of 'fig 1 are removed horizontally. Then the seven movable plates (5) are displaced downwards. The plate that was in line with Sunday is now below Sunday and in the region where it can be removed horizontally as shown in fig 6.1t is then transferred to the position of Monday after which the plates (6), fig 1, are returned to their original position. This is done for the plates in the region of January and February, March to July and August to December. In essence only three plates are transferred from the rows of Sunday the rows of Monday as the rest of the Plates (5) are displacecollectively by one day forward.
For a leap year that follows a non-leap year, the dates are one day after the days of the same dates in the previous year. The new arrangement is effected by transferring the plate in the row of Sunday to the tow of Monday and at the same time using the alternative plate (9) of fig 5 with 29th February for the rest of the year the dates are 2 days after the days of the same dates of the previous year. This is because of the addition of 29th February. In this case, the plates in the sixth and seventh rows of March to December are transferred to the first and second rows respectively as the rest of the dates are moved down by two row:, each. This gives the calendar for the whole year.
For a non-leap year that follows a leap year, the dates of January and February are two days forward, the plate with 29th February is then replaced with the original plate (8) of fig 5 and the dates of March to December are one day forward each. This is because 29th February is now omitted.
The invention makes it possible to arrange for all years: one after another by displacement of the plates by at most two days forward at the start of every year.
In order to arrange the calendar for any arbitrary year, one can refer to a table, fig 7, that shows days of 1st January of some years and also shows which of the years are leap years. The table is based on the fact that the days of 1st January and the leap years are in a pattern that recurs after every 28 years. For years outside the scope of the table, the days are determined by calculation as follows: Let the year be denoted by Y. Take one of the years in the table as reference
year say the year 2000. It is a leap year with 1st of January being on a Saturday.

Y-2000=N remainder R (where N is a whole number and
28    R is a number less than 28).
The calendar for the year Y is exactly the same as that of Rth year after the 2000 which can be read from the table. If Y < 2000, then N and R are negative and the calendar for the year Y is exactly like that of the (R+28)th year after the year 2000. It is therefore possible to use the invention to produce a calendar for any year in the past, present or future without a limit.
Example 1
Using the formula, the day of 1st January of the year 0001 A.D can be determined as follows:
0001-2000 =-1999 =    -71 rem. -11
   28    28
-11+28 = 17
This means that the 1st of January of the 17th year after the year 2000 is on a 35 Sunday and it is a non-leap year. It follows that the date 01/01/0001 was on a Sunday.
The plate (2) fig 1 indicates the year of that particular calendar. One way of doing this is by use of four co-axial cylinders (14) with numbers 0-9 on each cylinder. Each cylinder can be rotated independently of the others with only one digit from each being exposed as in fig 8. This gives an upper limit of 9999 but this limit can be extended by increasing the number of cylinders if at all there is need to do so.
As for the fixed public holidays e.g. New Year, Labour Day and Christmas day, a special colour is used. For a particular country, other fixed public holidays can also be shown.
DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
The drawings in fig 1 represents the configuration of the calendar when set for the year 1997. (1) Is the main frame on which the parts of the calendar are supported. (2) Is the space where the figures of the year are exposed. (3) Are the fixed plates on which the months are indicated on. (4) Are also fixed plates on which the days of the week appear on. (5) Are the movable plates on which the dates appear. (6) Are movable plates that restrict (5) to the region where they cannot move horizontally. (7) Are fixed plates to support the movable plates and also to keep (4) to a height where the movable plates can pass below it.
Fig 2 shows how the arrangement for the first two months of 1997 look like. Fig 3 shows how the new positions of the plates when the row of Sunday 1997 is transferred to the row of Monday 1998.
Fig 4 shows a leap year 2000 in which the alternative plate with 29th February is indicated.
Fig 5 shows the alternative plates 8 for non-leap year and 9 for leap year. One can also be the back of the other.
Fig 6 (10) represents the notches put in the plates to prevent them from moving horizontally when in the region of the days. Here they can only be displayed vertically. (11) Is a cross section of the fixed day plates in the region of the days. (12) Is the entrance for all the movable date plates and (13) is their exit. (12 and (13) are occupied by movable plates (6) of fig 1 when the calendar is set.
Fig 7 shows the table used to read the first day of January .L indicates which of the years are leap years.
In Fig 8 (16) represents the exposed year 9999 on space (2) of fig 1. (14) Are the independent cylinders that move about the axis (15).
 
Claims
1. A calendar made of hard and durable material, which can be adapted to
show a calendar of any past present or future year and which comprises
plates, for months and days of the week fixed on a main frame, movable plates with dates written or engraved on them and a cylinder with moveable numbers.
2. A calendar as in claim 1 in which the plates for the months are fixed to
the main frame either vertically or horizontally.

3. A calendar as in claim 1 in which the plates for the days are fixed to the main frame either vertically or horizontally.
4. A calendar as in claim 1 in which the dates are indicated on moveable plates which can be moved vertically and horizontally beneath supports that are fixed to the main frame.

A calendar as in claim 1 and 4 in which the dates of the months of January and February are numbered on 7 moveable plates.

6. A calendar as in claim 5 in which there is provided an alternative moveable plate that shows 29th day of February.
7. A calendar as in claim 1 in which each cylinder can rotate independently of others about an axis with only one digit from each being exposed.
8. A calendar as in claim 1 in which fixed public holidays e.g. new year, labour day or Christmas day are shown using a special colour.

9. A calendar as in claim 1 in which there is provided means for restricting movement of the moveable plates once a calendar for a certain year has been set.
10. Means as in claim 9 for restricting movement of the moveable plates which comprises of notches underneath the fixed plates and grooves on the moveable plates.
 
ABSTRACT:
TITLE: ALL-TIME CALENDAR
The invention relates to an all-time calendar made of hard and durable material that shows the calendar of a whole year. The months and days of the week are
fixed while the dates are on plates that can be moved horizontally and vertically.
The calendar for a particular year is obtained by aligning the first seven dates of January, March and August, with the days of those dates. The rest of the dates get into their positions automatically. The day of 1st January which is the main guide for setting the calendar is obtained by use of a table or a formula together with the table.
It gives the calendar of any year in the past, present or future without a limit.

 

 

 

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