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(11) Patent Number: ICE 315 (45) Date of grant: 06/05/2009
19111
Nor, WArs131.1 Prep, InstitUte
(19) Kenya Industrial Property Institute.
(12) PATENT
(51) Int.CLS: B 65D 6/16, 8/14
(21)Application    KE/P/ 2007/ 000613    (84) WO No. WO 2006/075031
Number:    20/07/2006
(22)Filing Date:    03/07/2007
(31)Priority Number:    (32) Date: (33) Country:
(73)    Owner(s): BOXIDEA, Si. of Carni Graullers, s/n, E-46529 Canet d'en Berenguer, Spain
(72) Inventor(s)    RIO GONZALEZ, Juan, Josse and QUEROL PUIG,
Santiago, Antonio
(74)    Agent/address for correspondence: Hamilton Harrison & Mathews, P.O. Box 30333-00100, Nairobi
(54) Tide;    LID-EQUIPPED, MONOMATERTAL CONTAINER FOR HORTICULTURAL
USE
(57) Abstract; The invention relates to a lid-equipped, monomaterial container for horticultural use. The inventive container comprises six parts, namely: a base (1), two side panels (2, 2), two end panels (3, 3'), and a lid (4), all of which are made from medium- or high-density wood fibre. The aforementioned parts are assembled using a series of flanges (11 and 29) which project out from one of said parts and which are coupled in a tongue-and-groove manner to respective grooves (19 and 17) in other parts. The box also comprises stacking means in the form of ascending projections (20, 20; 24, 24') which are provided at the upper ends of the side and end panels and which define slanting edges that correspond to identically-shaped recesses that are provided at the lower ends of each panel, such that the containers are aligned automatically. The outwardly- projecting free ends of the above-mentioned fixing flanges form spacers between the boxes such as to define conduits for the passage of air between pallestised containers.
 
Collapsible container
The present invention relates to-a collapsible container, in particular a collapsible box pallet,
5 comprising a base, two side walls and two end walls, each wall extending between an inside plane and an outside plane and between opposed end edges, and the walls being detachably interconnected by means of mu-tually corresponding engagement portions.
10    GB 868 455 discloses a collapsible box pallet
composed of a plain pallet, four detachable walls and a lid, all made of wood. In order to detachably con¬nect adjacent walls, two opposed side walls are pro¬vided with L-shaped corner straps, which have verti-
15 cal slots, which engage in a downward direction with horizontal pins on two opposed end walls_ In order to facilitate transport of the four sides of the pallet when the complete pallet is returned empty, it is possible to pack the four sides, and the lid if re-
20 quired, to form a flat package However, to avoid loss of parts of the pallet during transport, it is necessary to manually provide the package with straps or clips in order to hold the parts of the package together. GB 1 002 241 describes a similar collapsi-
25 ble box pallet.
GB 1 066 244 shows a collapsible box pallet,
comprising a pallet base, a first pair of opposite
walls arranged to be detachably secured at their
lower edges to a first pair of opposite edges of the
30 pallet base by sliding along the line of the edges, a
second pair of opposite walls arranged to be slidably
and detachably secured to a second pair of opposite
edges of the pallet base by sliding along the line of
 
2
the edges whereby they abut against and locate said first pair of opposite walls. Furthermore, the top corners of the walls are detachably secured by a piv¬otally stirrup on one wall engaging a post on an ad-
5 jacent wall.
GB 1 392 808 discloses a collapsible container having a base and four detachable walls. The walls are attached to the base by means of tabs projecting from the lower edge of the walls and engaging in
10 holes of the base. Furthermore, two of the walls be¬ing opposed to each other have, at each of their up¬permost corners, an engagement member projecting from the corner in the direction of the upper edge of the wall and having a downward protruding pin engaging a
15 corresponding socket in the upper edge of an adjacent one'of the other two opposed walls. Ecmever, in the collapsed state, the base, walls and lid of this con-tainer must, like all the above described containers, be held together by means of clips, straps or simi-
20 larly means, which must be attached manually before transport of the collapsed container.
The object of the present invention is to pro-vide a collapsible container that is easy to disas-semble and transport in the collapsed state.
25    In view' of this object, the engagement portions
of each end wall protrude from the inside plane of said end wall in the direction of the opposed end wall, the engagement portions of each side wall pro¬trude from the end edges of said side wall, and each
30 side wall and its engagement portions are confined
between the opposed inside planes of the end walls.
By providing the engagement between the end walls and the side walls within the room between the
 
3
inside planes of the end walls, it is achieved that
both the end walls and the side walls of several dis-
assembled containers may be accommodated inside a
similar, but still assembled, container, substan-
5 tially without extending from the open top side of
the assembled container. This is possible, because
the side walls of the disassembled containers may be
arranged with their longitudinal axis substantially
parallel to the longitudinal axis of the side walls
10 of the assembled container. Thereby, several walls
may be arranged parallel to each other, whereby the
available space in the container may be utilized in a
most efficient way. This in turn means that the vol-
ume taken up by a given number of empty containers

15 may be reduced considerably, whereby freight charges may be minimized.
In an advantageous embodiment, each pair of in-terconnected engagement portions comprises a channel with a constricted opening and a rib having a head
20 portion slidable into the channel. Thereby it is en¬sured that each pair of interconnected engagement portions will not disengage, for instance as a result of pressure exerted on the walls by bulk goods inside the container. Furthermore, the walls may be assem-
25 bled and disassembled in a simple manner by mutual displacement of the walls in the direction of the channel.
In an advantageous embodiment in terms of
strength and manufacture, the channel with a con-
30 stricted opening has a substantially circular cross-
section, and the head portion of the rib has a corre-
sponding substantially circular cross-section. This
embodiment is furthermore easy to clean, because the
 
4
circular shape of the engagement portions leaves no corners, where dirt could collect.
In a further advantageous embodiment, adjacent walls of the container, by mutual displacement in the
5 channel direction, may be brought to a disengagement position, in which an engagement portion of the rib is aligned with a disengagement portion of the chan¬nel, in which disengagement portion the channel has an opening without restriction, and an engagement
10 portion of the channel is aligned with a disengage¬ment portion of the rib, in which disengagement por¬tion the rib has no head portion, so that said adja¬cent walls subsequently may be disengaged by mutual displacement crosswise to the channel direction.
15 Thereby, the walls may be disconnected from . each other by a mutual,displacement in the vertical direc¬tion that is smaller, or much smaller, than the full length of the channel, i.e. the height of the walls. This makes it much easier to handle the walls, when
20 disassembling or assembling the container.
In an embodiment especially easy to manufac¬ture, each wall is injection-moulded integrally with its engagement portions. Furthermore, the washability of the disassembled container is further improved, as
25 corners and cavities, where dirt could gather, may be avoided.
In an embodiment, at least one of the walls of
the container is divided into at least two separate
wall sections, of which one is placed on top of the
30 other, and which may be removed consecutively from
the container. Thereby gradual emptying of the con-
tainer is facilitated, when at the same time bulk
goods, for instance, remaining in the container, may
 
5
still be kept well in place inside the container. This is achieved by firstly removing the uppermost wall section, taking out the upper quantity of the bulk goods, then removing the second uppermost wall
5 section, subsequently taking out the bulk goods at the level of the just removed wall part, and so on. In this way it is avoided that a person has to assume an awkward position, that is, to stoop excessively to pick up goods located very low in relation to the top
10 edge of the container wall. This means that the con-tainer may be emptied in a correct way in terms of ergonomics, which is a requirement for instance at the distribution of bulk goods in supermarkets. This embodiment is an invention in itself, and it may be
15 .applied to .a container independently of the configu-
. ration of the remaining walls of'the container, that is, the walls that are not divided into separate wall sections may be fixed and possibly also connected permanently to each other.
20    In an embodiment, each separate wall section
comprises two channels, each being composed by two engagement portions separated by a disengagement por¬tion. This makes it possible to remove a wall section from the container after a small displacement of the
.25 wall.section in the channel direction; the necessary • displacement may be much smaller than the height of the wall section to be removed. In particular, it is not necessary to displace the lower situated wall sections all the way to the top of the container edge
30 in order to remove those wall sections from the con-tainer.
In another embodiment, each separate wall sec-tion comprises two ribs, each being composed by two
 
6
engagement portions separated by a disengagement por-tion. Thereby the same advantages are achieved as ex-plained in the paragraph above, in the case where the engagement portions of the removable wall sections
5 have the form of ribs.
In an embodiment, the channel extends between two channel walls of which one is discontinued in the disengagement portion of the channel, and the rib is discontinued in its disengagement portion. This makes
10 it possible to remove a side wall of the container after a small displacement in the vertical direction without having to first remove an end wall of the container. This is also especially advantageous in the case where one of the side walls is divided into
15 more separate wall sections, .as it otherwise would be necessary to lift said wall sections all the way to the top edge of the container in order to remove them from the assembled container.
In an embodiment, adjacent wall sections are
20 interconnected by means of extensible strings. Thereby one or more of the upper separate wall sec-tions of a container wall may be kept in place at the container after its removal from the wall, that is the removed wall sections will hang in the extensible
25 strings. In this way, the separate wall sections are always kept as a part of the wall to which they are associated and do not get lost during the gradual emptying of the container, or subsequently during transport of the container. Furthermore, when worn
30 out, the strings may easily be replaced on site by any suitable strings available. The strings may even be easily removed but cutting, if so preferred.
In an embodiment, the walls are provided with
 
7
downward extending guide flaps at a lower edge. The guide flaps ensure that the walls are kept in place at the edge of the base of the container, such as a plain pallet.
5    In an embodiment, the external length of the
side walls is larger than the external length of the end walls.
The invention further relates to a method of packing several identical collapsible containers, in
10 particular collapsible box pallets, each container comprising a base, two side walls and two end walls, whereby a container is disassembled by mutual dis¬placement of adjacent walls in vertical direction. According to the invention, the method is character-
15 ized by that the walls of the disassembled container are placed in an assembled one of the identical col-lapsible containers, whereby the side walls of the disassembled container are arranged with their longi¬tudinal axis substantially parallel to the longitudi-
20 nal axis of the side walls of the assembled con¬tainer. Thereby the above-mentioned advantage is achieved.
In a specific advantageous embodiment of the method according to the invention, the containers
25 have a horizontal cross-section of approximately 1200 mm x 800 mm, all walls of five disassembled contain¬ers are arranged inside one assembled container, and all the bases of said five disassembled containers are stacked on top of each other.
30    In a further specific advantageous embodiment
of the method, the containers have a horizontal
cross-section of approximately 800 mm x 600 mm, all
walls of six disassembled containers are arranged in-
 
8
side two assembled containers, and all the bases of said six disassembled containers are stacked on top of each other.
The invention will now be explained in more de-5 tail below by means of examples of embodiments with reference to the schematic drawing, in which
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a collapsible box pallet according to the invention, whereby a wall section has been removed and placed in a hanging posi-
10 tion,
Fig. 2 is a side view of the box pallet in Fig.
1,
Fig. 3 is a top view of the box pallet in Fig. 1; however, shown in the state before removal of said 15 wall section,.
Fig. 4 is a:detail of Fig. 3. on a larger scale, Fig. 5 is a detail of Fig. 1 on a larger scale, Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a collapsible
half box pallet 1' according to the invention, whereby
20 one wall section has been removed,
Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the half box pallet 1' in Fig. 6, whereby the wall section, which has been removed in Fig. 6, has been put back in the side wall of the box pallet,
25    Fig. 8 is an end view of the half box pallet l'
in Fig. 6,
Fig. 9 is a cross section of the half box pallet 1' along the line IX-IX in Fig. 8,
Fig. 10 is a detail of the half box pallet 1' in 30 Fig. 6 on a larger scale,
Fig. 11 is a perspective view of six box pallets of the type shown in Fig. 1, which have been packed to take up the volume of approximately two box pallets of
 
9
this type,
Fig. 12 is an end view of the packed box pallet shown in Fig. 11,
Fig. 13 is a cross section of the packed box 5 pallet along the line XIII-XIII in Fig. 12,
Fig. 14 is a perspective view of eight half box pallets 1' of the type shown in Fig. 6 packed to take up the volume of approximately three half box pallets 1' of this type,
10    Fig. 15 is a top view of the packed half box
pallets l' in Fig. 14,
Fig. 16 is a perspective view of three box pal-lets of the type shown in Fig. 1 which have been stacked on top of each other, and
15 .    Fig. 17 is a perspective view of a. half.box pal-
let 1' of the type shown in Fig. 6 provided with a:lid and three small crates on top of the lid.
Fig. 1 shows a collapsible box pallet 1 accord-ing to the invention, comprising a base in the form
20 of a plain pallet 2, opposed first and second side walls 3, 4 and opposed first and second end walls 5, 6. Each of the end walls 5, 6 of the box pallet 1 are divided into three.separate wall sections 16, 17, 18, which is placed on top of each other, thereby abut-
25 ting each other along horizontal lines. The walls 3, 4, 5, 6 and the wall sections 16, 17, 18 are all pro¬vided with downward protruding guide flaps 26 at their lower edges in order to guide their position in relation to the plain pallet 2 and the lower wall
30 sections, respectively.
Although the invention in the following will be exemplified in the form of a box pallet, it will be understood by the man skilled in the art that the in-
 
10
vention is equally applicable to a collapsible con¬tainer that does not have the form of a box pallet. The collapsible container according to the invention may be used for transport and/or storage of any kind
5 of goods, such as bulk goods, for instance fruit or other kinds of foodstuffs. The collapsible container may also be utilised for display and distribution of goods for instance in a supermarket.
The collapsible container 1 according to the
10 invention may be produced of any kind of suitable ma-terial; however, in the case of a box pallet for the transportation of goods such as foodstuff, it is pre-ferred that the pallet walls 3, 4, 5, 6 are produced of a suitable plastic material, such as polypropylene
15 or possibly glass reinforced material, such as poly-amide or the like. Preferably, the walls are produced by injection-moulding. The plain pallet 2 may be of the conventional type made of wood or it may also be made of a suitable plastic material, possibly rein-
20 forced. Advantageously, substantially all parts of the container are produced mainly of a suitable plas¬tic material, whereby the washability of the con¬tainer 1 is highly improved. Furthermore, the walls of the collapsible box pallet are advantageously pro-
25 vided with a number of evenly distributed apertures 7 in order to allow a cleaning fluid to penetrate the walls during washing.
Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, each end wall 5, 6
is provided with an engagement portion 8 protruding
30 from an inside plane 9 of said end wall 5, 6 in the
direction of the opposed end wall 5, 6. Fig. 4 shows
the engagement portion 8 protruding from the inside
plane 9 of the first end wall 5 in the direction of
 
11
the opposed second end wall 6. Furthermore it may be seen that the side walls 3, 4 have engagement por¬tions 10 protruding from end edges 11 of the side walls in the longitudinal direction of the side
5 walls. In Fig. 4 the extension of the inside plane 9 of the first end wall 5 is indicated by means of a broken line, and it is understood that the side walls 3, 4 and their engagement portions 10 are confined between the opposed inside planes 9 of the end walls
10 5, 6. This means that the total outer dimension of the side walls 3, 4 including their engagement por¬tions 10, in the longitudinal direction of the side walls, is smaller than the distance between the in¬side planes 9 of the end walls 5, 6 in the assembled
15 box pallet shown in Figs, 1 to-4, and consequently it is possible to accommodate not only the end walls 5, 6 but also the side walls 3, 4 of a disassembled box pallet of the type shown in Fig. 1 in a still assem¬bled box pallet of the same type. This is illustrated
20 in Figs. 11 to 13.
Referring again to Fig. 4, it may be seen that
the engagement portion 8 of the first end wall 5 com-
prises a channel 12 having a substantially circular
cross-section, extending along a vertical edge of the
25 end wall 5 and having a constricted opening 13. The
end edge 11 of the side wall 4 is provided with a
corresponding vertically extending rib 14 provided
with a head portion 15 inserted in and having a sub-
stantially circular cross-section corresponding to
30 the channel 12 in the engagement portion 8 of the end
wall 5. However, the channel 12 and the corresponding
head portion 15 of the rib 14 may have another cross-
section than circular, for instance a square or oc-
 
12
tagonal cross-section.
Fig. 5 shows a detail of the corner between the
first end wall 5 and the second side wall 4 of the
box pallet 1 in Fig. 1. The upper wall section 16 of
5 the first end wall 5 has been disengaged from the box
pallet 1 and is hanging in front of the second wall
section 17 of the end wall 5 in strings 19 by means
of which the two wall sections 16, 17 are connected.
The upper part of the rib 14 on the second side wall
10 4, which is adapted to engage the upper wall section
16 of the end wall 5, is visible, because the wall
section 16 has been removed, and it may be seen that
this upper part of the rib 14 is divided into two en-
gagement portions 20 having a head portion 15 and an
15 intermediate disengagement portion 21, where the rib
14 has no head portion. Correspondingly, the channel
12 in the engagement portion 8 of the first end wall
5, which is visible on the loosely hanging wall sec-
tion 16, comprises two engagement portions 22, where
20 the channel has a restricted opening 13, and an in-
termediate disengagement portion 23, where the chan-
nel 12 has an opening without restriction. As it will
be understood by the person skilled in the art, the
loosely hanging wall section 16 may be placed on top
25 of the wall section 17 and brought into engagement
with the second side wall 4 in the following way:
Firstly, the wall section 16 is swung upwards and
held at the level of the upper part of the rib 14, so
that the, in this position, lower engagement portion
30 22 of the channel 12 is positioned adjacent the dis-
engagement portion 21 of the rib 14. In this posi-
tion, the engagement portion 22 may be inserted over
the disengagement portion 21 of the rib 14, and the
 
13
disengagement portion 23 may be inserted over the up¬per engagement portion 20 of the rib 14, by a dis-placement.crosswise to the direction of the channel 12. Subsequently, the wall section 16 may be dis-
5 placed downwards, vertically in the direction of the channel 12, so that both engagement portions 22 of the wall section 16 engage the engagement portions 20, respectively, of the rib 14, whereby the wall section 16 is held in place engaging the side walls
10 3, 4.
Referring to Figs. 3, 4 and 5, it may be under-stood by the man skilled in the art, that the engage-ment portion 8 of the end wall 5 and the engagement portion 10 of the side wall 4 could be inverted, so
15 that•the engagement portion 8 of the end wall.5 were provided-with the rib 14, and, correspondingly,.the engagement portion 10 of the side wall 4 had the form of the channel 12.
Figs. 6 to 10 show another embodiment of the
20 box pallet according to the invention, whereby side
walls 3', 4' have been divided into separate wall
sections 16', 17', 18', instead of the end walls, as
it is the case in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1.
This embodiment has the form of a so-called half box
25 pallet 1', which relates to the fact that the plain
pallet 2' has the shape and size of half the plain
pallet 2 in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1. The box
pallet shown in Fig. 1 has a length of approximately
1200 mm, a width of approximately 800 mm and a height
30 of approximately 800 mm. The half box pallet 1' shown
in Fig. 6 has a length of approximately 800 mm, a
width of approximately 600 mm and a height of ap-
proximately 800 mm. However, the collapsible con-
 
14
tainer 1 according to the invention may be produced with any measures suitable for the actual purpose.
Fig. 10 shows a detail. of the corner between the second end wall 6' and the second side wall 4' of
5 the half box pallet 1' shown in Fig. 6. In the em¬bodiment shown in Fig. 10, the separate wall sections 16', 17', 18' is provided with a rib 14' having two engagement sections 20', in which the rib 14' is pro¬vided with a head section 15', and an intermediate
10 disengagement portion 21', in which the rib 14' is discontinued. The end wall 6' is provided with an en-gagement portion 8' having a vertical channel 12'. The channel 12' extends between an inner channel wall 24 and an outer channel wall 25. The channel 12' is
15 composed of two engagement portions .22' and an inter-mediate.disengagement portion 23'. In the *disengage-ment portion 23', the outer channel wall 25 is dis¬continued, which permits removal of the wall section 16' by firstly sliding the wall section upward in the
20 direction of the channel 12' and secondly displacing
the wall section cross-wise the channel direction.
In Figs. 11 to 13, six box pallets of the type shown in Fig. 1 has been reduced to the size of ap¬proximately two box pallets of the same type by dis-
25 assembling five of the box pallets as described above, packing the wall sections of the disassembled box pallets in the remaining assembled box pallet and stabling the plain pallets 2 of the five disassembled box pallets on top of each other. Similarly Figs. 14
30 to 15 illustrate the case, where eight half box pal¬lets 1' of the type shown in Fig. 6 have been reduced to the size of approximately three half box pallets of the same type by disassembling six of the half box
 
15
pallets as described above, packing all the walls of the disassembled half box pallets in the two remain¬ing assembled half box pallets and stabling the six plain pallets 2' of the disassembled half box pallets
5 on top of each other.
Eventually it should be noted that, in the dis-assembled state of the collapsible container accord¬ing to the invention, the walls and the plain pallet of the container may easily be washed in a so-called
10 flume type washing machine or a tunnel washing ma¬chine. This is not possible with conventional con¬tainers that cannot be disassembled, and consequently such containers have to be washed in much larger and therefore more expensive machines.
15
 
16
PATENT CLAIMS
1. A collapsible container, in particular a collapsible box pallet, comprising a base, two side walls and two end' walls, each wall extending between
5 an inside plane and an outside plane and between op-posed end edges, and the walls being detachably in¬terconnected by means of mutually corresponding engagement portions, characterized in that the engagement portions of each end wall pro-
10 trade from the inside plane of said end wall in the direction of the opposed end wall, in that the en¬gagement portions of each side wall protrude from the end edges of said side wall, and in that each side wall and its engagement portions are confined between
15 the opposed.inside planes of the.end walls.
2. A collapsible container according to claith
1, characterized    in that each pair of
interconnected engagement portions comprises a chan-
nel with a constricted opening and a rib having a
20 head portion slidable into the channel.
3. A collapsible container according to claim
2, characterized    in that the channel
with a constricted. opening has a substantially circu-
lar cross-section, and in that the head portion of
25 the rib has a corresponding substantially circular cross-section.
4. A collapsible container according to claim 2 or 3, characterized in that adjacent walls of the container, by mutual displacement in the
30 channel direction, may be brought to a disengagement position, in which an engagement portion of the rib is aligned with a disengagement portion of the chan¬nel, in which disengagement portion the channel has
 
17
an opening without restriction, and an engagement portion of the channel is aligned with a disengage¬ment portion of the rib, in which disengagement por¬tion the rib has no head portion, so that said adja-
5 cent walls subsequently may be disengaged by mutual displacement crosswise to the channel direction.
5.    A collapsible container according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that each wall is injection-moulded integrally
10 with its engagement portions.
6.    A collapsible container according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that at least one of the walls of the container is divided into at least two separate wall sections, of
15 which-one is placed on top of the other, and which may be removed consecutively from the container..
7.    A collapsible container according to claim 6, characterized in that each separate wall section comprises two channels, each being com-
20 posed by two engagement portions separated by a dis-engagement portion.
8.    A collapsible container according to claim 6, characterized    in that each separate
wall section comprises two ribs, each being composed
25 by two engagement portions separated by a disengage¬ment portion.
9.    A collapsible container according to any one of the claims 4 to 8, characterized in that the channel extends between two channel walls of
30 which one is discontinued in the disengagement por¬tion of the channel, and in that the rib is discon¬tinued in its disengagement portion.
10.    A collapsible container according to any
 
18
one of the claims 6 to 9, characterized in that adjacent wall sections are interconnected by means of extensible strings.
11.    A collapsible container according to any
5 one of the preceding claims, character¬ized in that the walls are provided with down¬ward extending guide flaps at a lower edge.
12.    A collapsible container according to any one of the preceding claims, character-
10ized in that the external length of the side walls is larger than the external length of the end walls.
13.    A method of packing several identical col-lapsible containers, in particular collapsible box
15 pallets, each container comprising abase, two- side walls and two end walls,. whereby a container is dis¬assembled by mutual displacement of adjacent walls in vertical direction, characterized by that the walls of the disassembled container are
20 placed in an assembled one of the identical collapsi¬ble containers, whereby the side walls of the disas¬sembled container are arranged with their longitudi¬nal axis substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the side walls of the assembled container.
25  14. A method of packing several identical col-lapsible containers according to claim 13, c h a r - acterized by that the containers have a horizontal cross-section of approximately 1200 mm x 800 mm, by that all walls of five disassembled con-
30 tainers are arranged inside one assembled container, and by that all the bases of said five disassembled containers are stacked on top of each other.
15. A method of packing several identical col-
 
19
lapsible containers according to claim 13, c h a r - acterized by that the containers have a horizontal cross-section of approximately 800 mm x 600 mm, by that all walls of six disassembled con-
5 tainers are arranged inside two assembled containers, and by that all the bases of said six disassembled containers are stacked on top of each other.

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