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 (11) Patent Number: KE 163
(45) Date of grant: 26/09/2003

(12) PATENT
 
(51) Int.CL8: A 24B 15/30
(21) Application Number: 1999/ 000135
(22) Filing Date: 09/08/2000
(30) Priority data:09/020958 09/02/1998 (/S and 09/064021 21/04/1998 US
(86) PCT data:
PCT/US99/02287 03/02/1999
WO 99/39595    12/08/1999
 
(73) Owner:
ROUSSEAU RESEARCH, INC. of , 3122 BANDERA DRIVE PALO ALTO CA 94304, U.S.A.
(72) Inventor: RUSSO, Joseph, D,
(74) Agent/address for correspondence: A. N. Kamau Advocates, P.o.Box 332624 Nairobi
 
(54) Title: TOBACCO PRODUCTS WITH VITAMIN E
(57) Abstract:
A substantially pure Vitamin E type compound is added to tobacco and non-tobacco for a smokeable or smokeless product to achieve less irritation and antioxidant benefits. Ina preferred embodiment, a substantially pure "dry" powdered ester analog of Vitamin E, such as Vitamin E acid succinate or spray dried Vitamin E acetate, is mixeddirectly with the tobacco or non-tobacco product during the manufacturing process. These Vitamin E analogs can also be inserted into a cigarette filter (20), holder and/or paper (26), either in powdered form or in microencapsulated form. Although not preferred, a common oily form of Vitamin E can be used in the present invention so long as it does not ruin the appearance and function of the smokeable or smokeless product.
 
 
TOBACCO PRODUCTS WITH VITAMIN E
This is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial 09/020,958, entitled "Cigarette With Vitamin E", filed February 9, 1590 and still pending.
TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to smoking tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco (bulk), and smokeless tobacco products, also known as chewing tobacco. More particularly, a novel form of smokeable cigarette, cigar and bulk tobacco and smokeless tobacco is disclosed which includes a health enhancing Vitamin n type additive.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Health problems associated with cigarette smoking, cigar-smoking, pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco have been well publicized. In various scientific studies, cigarette smoking, cigar smoking, pipe smoking and use of smokeless tobacco have been linked to diseases such as lung, throat, and mouth and other cancers as well as emphysema, smoker's cough and heart trouble.
Various attempts have been made to address cigarette health problems through reformulation of cigarettes. For example, special blends of tobacco have been formulated for cigarettes with reduced levels of tar and nicotine.
Unfortunately, each reduction of the tar and nicotine level has been accompanied by a corresponding reduced level of smoker satisfaction. As such, sales of lowered tar and nicotine cigarettes, particularly those commercially classified as "ultralow tar and nicotine have not lived up to expectations. More recently, efforts have been made to altogether remove additives from cigarettes while such 'additive free" cigarettes may provide a purer smoke, it is unclear whether they provide any corresponding health benefits. In fact, because they contain no additive diluents, their tar and nicotine levels are increased,
Attempts have also been-made to insert additives into cigarettes to offset some of the hazardous substances present in tobacco. For example, U.S. Patent No. 5,016,655 (1'655 patent") recommends insertion of alcohols into the tobacco or filters of cigarettes in order to. Neutralize the carcinogenic effect of N-nitrosaMines, such as N'- Nitrosoncronicotine (NNN). According to the '655 patent, these alcohols can be advantageously packaged with other chemicals such as Vitamins A, E, c and E. Nonetheless, in Table IV of the '655 patent, it is taught that use of Vitamin E as a stand-alone additive (i.e., apart from an alcohol mixture) is ineffective in neutralizing NNN.
Similarly, in published POT application No. NO 95/26096, it is suggested that cigarette additives can be formed from a complex of eukaryotic cell cultures with Vitamin E or a solution of natural substances of plant origin having anti-mutagenic and aromatizing properties also with Vitamin E.
Nonetheless, there is no suggestion in this PCT publication that Vitamin E can have any efficacy as a stand-alone additive for cigarettes.
In U. S. Patents No. 3,339,556 ("'558 patent") and 3,557,478 ("0416 patent"), Vitamin A is recommended as a primary cigarette additive to promote better health. The, 558 patent teaches that the Vitamin A should be inserted within the cigarette filtering medium in rupturable capsules, while the '478 patent teaches that a stabilized aqueous emulsion of active Vitamin A should be applied to the tobacco in a cigarette. The '478 patent indicates that other vitamins,
such as Vitamins C, D, E etc., can be added to the vitamin A emulsion but does not suggest that any of the other vitamins can be advantageously used as a stand-alone additive.
As noted, none of this prior art suggests the use of Vitamin E or a Vitamin E analog as a stand-alone cigarette additive, much less what forms, quantities and delivery mechanisms should be used for such a stand-alone Vitamin type additive.
 
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention provides an effective technique for adding a substantially pure Vitamin E type compound to cigarettes, cigars, bulk pipe tobacco and smokeless or "chewing" tobacco, as smokeless tobacco is commonly known. In smokeable tobacco products, such substantially pure Vitamin E additives have been unexpectedly found to achieve, to a great degree, a much less irritating smoke along with Vitamin S's antioxidant benefits. This beneficial effect may also apply to the second hand smoke irritation commonly experienced by non-smokers. In smokeless
tobacco, substantially pure Vitamin E additives have been unexpectedly found to reduce irritation to the cheeks, gums, palette, throat and esophagus,
In a preferred embodiment, a substantially pure, "dry" powdered analog of Vitamin S, known as d-alpha cocopheryl acid succinate or Vitamin S acid succinace, is mixed directly with the tobacco used in smokeable or smokeless tobacco during the manufacturing process. This Vitamin E analog can also be inserted into a cigarette filter, holder or paper or wrapper. Other preferred "dry" forms of Vitamin E analog which can advantageously be used with the present
invention are forms of d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, d-alpha tocopherol, dl-alpha-tocopherol or natural mixed tocopherols which are spray dried on a suitable carrier (e.g., gelatin or gum acacia). Although not preferred, a Common clear, viscous oily form of natural Vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) or its liquid analogs can be used in the present invention so long as it is used in a way that does not ruin the appearance and function of the smokeable product (e.g., incorporated through microencapsulation or diffused into the tobacco or filter in
such, a way that it is stabilized and does not leach into cigarette paper or wrappers to show oily residue) or agglomerate smokeless tobacco.
 
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 shows a side elevation view of a typical cigarette.
FIG. 2 shows a cutaway side elevation view of the 5     typical cigarette of FIG. 1. 
  .FIG. 3 shows a cutaway side elevation view of an alternative form of cigarette which can accommodate a filter insert.
FIG. 4 shows a cutaway aide elevation view of a second alternative form of cigarette which can accommodate a filter insert.
DESCRIPTION OF THE SPECIFIC EMBODIMENTS
Vitamin E or a-alpha tocopherol and its analogs have been found to act as an anti-inflammatory and an antioxidant which can deactivate cell-damaging free radicals. Vitamin E is most commonly obtained in a viscous, oily form from vegetable oil distillates vitamin E is then used in this oily form by tither applying it directly to skin tissue or taking it orally in a capsulated daily vitamin supplement.
While the common oily form of Vitamin E may be acceptable for many uses, it presents problems when applied to the modified smokeable or smokeless tobacco of the present invention.
For example, if common oily Vitamin E is applied directly to a cigarette, it will have a tendency to migrate and ooze into the cigarette paper and thereby ruin the feel and appearance of the cigarette. Also, the common oily form of Vitamin E will have a tendency to interact with tobacco and other natural ingredients in a way that may detrimentally affect the stability of the Vitamin E. It is for these reasons that "dry" analogs of Vitamin E are preferred for the present invention in order to best maintain a clean feel and appearance for the smokeable and smokeless tobacco as well as preserving the stability of the vitamin E.
One "dry” ester analog of Vitamin E that is preferred for the present invention 'is known variously as dalpha tocopheryl acid succinate, Vitamin H acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl hydrogen succinate and 3,5,7,8-Tetramethy1-2-(4',8',12'- trimethyltridecyl)-6-ohromanol acid succinate. Vitamin E acid Succinata has an empirical formula of C33H54O5, and a molecular weight of 530.79. The chemical structure of Vitamin E acid succinate is as follows:
 
 
Vitamin E acid succinate is a succinate derivative of d-alpha tocopheryl in the form of a white to off-white crystalline powder with little or no odor or taste. Vitamin E acid succinate can be prepared by the vacuum distillation and succinylation of edible vegetable oil products. Vitamin E acid succinate can be commercially obtained from the Eastman Chemical Corporation of Kingsport, Tennessee as Eastman product PM4009 or E-1210. Vitamin E acid succinate can also be commercially obtained from the Henkel Corporation of LaGrange, Illinois as COVITCLO 1210 or from the Archer Daniels midland Company of Decatur, Illinois.
Another "dry. ester analog of Vitamin E that is preferred for the present invention is a spray dried, carrier based form of Vitamin E known variously as d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, Vitamin E acetate, 2R,4,R,8'R-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, and 2,5,7,8-Tetramethy1-2-(4',8',12' trimethyltridecy1)-5-chromanol acetate, This alternative “dry" form of Vitamin E is also typically derived from vegetable oils, and then spray dried onto a suitable carrier
such as gelatin or gum acacia. Vitamin E acetate has an empirical formula of C71HnO3 and a molecular weight of 472.75.
The chemical structure of Vitamin E acetate is as follows:

 
 
 
The preferred "dry" form of vitamin E acetate is anacetate derivative of d-alpha tocopheryl in the form of a water-dispersible, fine powder containing d-alpha tocopharyl acetate spray-dried in a surface treated carrier. It is light can in color with a bland odor and taste, Vitamin .E acetate spray dried onto a gelatin carrier can be commercially obtained from the Archer Daniels Midland Corporation as product E-700. It can also be commercially obtained from the Henkel Corporation of LaGrange, Illinois as COVITOIA 700WD, a form of vitamin 12 acetate which is spray dried onto a carrier of gum acacia.
Other "dry" forms of Vitamin E which are suitable for the present invention and can be obtained from Henkel Corporation include COVITOL® F-350m and COV-OX®T-30P. COVITOL® F-350M is a cream colored powder containing mixed natural tocopherols (i.e., including the-, g-, y- and 5-forms of tocopherol), spray dried and a carrier of gelatin, dextrin, and glucose that is surface treated. Taste and odor of COVITGL1' P-35om is bland to mild. COV-0X0 T-30P is a light color powder which also contains "natural mixed tocopherols" (i.e.: including the-, p-, 7- and’s- forms of tocopherol), spray dried on a carrier of gum acacia. Like COVITOL® F-350M,
the taste and odor of COV-0X6 T-30P is bland to mild. As another "dry" alternative, a synthetic form of Vitamin E, namely dl-alpha-tocopherol, which is spray dried onto a suitable carrier (e.g., gelatn or gum acacia) can be advantageously used for the present invention.
The preferred "dry" forms of Vitamin E can be incorporated into a smokeable or smokeless tobacco in a number of different ways including being directly mixed with the tobacco or inserted into the cigarette filter, holder or paper, either in its powdered forth, spray dried form or in microencapsulated form. These methods of incorporation can best be explained in connection with the drawings. Referring now to FIG. 1, a typical form 'Of cigarette 10 is shown which
includes a filter section 12 and a tobacco section 14. A cutaway view of this typical cigarette is shown in FIG.2, where the tobacco rod 13, filter 20, tobacco paper 22, plug wrap 24 and filter paper 26 can be more clearly seen.
In one embodiment of the present invention, a substantially pure, "dry' form of Vitamin E can be blended into, sprayed or dusted onto the full or cut tobacco leaves during the manufacturing process. In that way, the substantially pure, dry" form of Vitamin E will already be incorporated onto the tobacco when it is rolled into the cigarette shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 or packaged in a bulk smokeless container. While the quantity of vitamin E to be used in this process can vary, it is expected that between 0,1 and 5000 milligrams of Vitamin E or Vitamin E analog would be a suitable amount for a smokeable product or smokeless tobacco wad containing 400-1200 milligrams of tobacco, with a more preferred amount of Vitamin E or Vitamin E analog to be between 0.1e to 20.0k by weight of tobacco or 0.4 milligrams to 240 milligrams for a smokeable product or smokeless tobacco wad containing 400-1200 milligram of tobacco.
In a second embodiment, the "dry' form of Vitamin E can be incorporated into the cigarette filter  either as dispersed powder particles 30, liquid infused into the filter medium or microencapsulated powder particles 30A. Such powdered particles 30 or microencapsulated powdered particles30A could also be incorporated into tobacco paper 22, plug
wrap 24 end/or filter paper 26.
Referring now to PIG. 3, an opening 32 is shown in the middle of the filter 20 which can accommodate concentrated Vitamin E or Vitamin E analog in either powdered form or
encapsulated form. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 4, a Vitamin t or Vitamin E analog insert 36 could be made in the filter section between the actual filter 20 and the tobacco section 14. This insert 36 might contain an encapsulated section 14. This insert 36 might contain an encapsulated Vitamin E compound or suitably wrapped powdered Vitamin E compound (e.g., wrapped in paper). Similarly, a narrower vitamin E insert (not shown), could be incorporated into the
tobacco section 14 of the cigarette.
Microencapsulation can be used in the present invention, as a Suitable delivery device for a Vitamin E compound in its preferred "dry" form or more common oily form. Microencapsulation initially isolates the Vitamin 2 compound and provides for its controlled release so that, for a
smokeable tobacco product, it can interact with its smoke stream environment. The shell wall microencapsulation construction should be sufficiently compatible with the Vitamin S compound contained therein to retain the Vitamin E compound until such time as the heat of the smoke causes the shell to open. In other words, the microcapsule is stable within the cigarette until it is smoked. At that point, the smoke's heat triggers the release of the Vitamin E compound.
Ideally, the shell wall should comprise between 20% and 50% of capsule volume for stability so as to resist rupture in the making, packing and consumer handling of the cigarette. The microcapsules should be 3 to 10 microns in circumference when placed on the cigarette paper 22, 24, 25 or mixed with the tobacco 16 so as to avoid undesired bumpiness on cigarette paper or to remain invisible if placed in the tobacco. Larger circumferences up to 50 microns are acceptable if the microcapsules are placed in the cigarette filter. Moreover, the capsules can be dyed with suitable food dyes to match the color of the filter or tobacco.
This vitamin E microencapsulation can be accomplished by a shell wall construction referred to as the M-CAF Process of Insulation Technologies Corporation of Darby, Pennsylvania. The general specification of the M-cap shell walls are capsules as small as three microns with melt temperatures of 64°F to 650°F. The encapsulation material of the shell wall can be ELVAV '(ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymers) or a similar cellulite material having the desired characteristics of a suitable shell wall release temperature between 64OF and 6500F. ELVAX™ is an ethylene vinyl acetate resin, such as described in the "Material Safety Data Sheet - VAX001," dated October 20, 1985, of E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. of Wilmington,, Delaware.
Other shall wall candidates include BERMOCOLL™ which is an ethylhydroryethylcellulose manufactured by Berol Kami AB of stenungsund, Sweden; K&K Gelatin, which is a gelatin manufactured by the Kind & Knox division of Knox Gelatine, Inc. of Saddle Brook, N.,7.; N-LOKw, which is anemulsion stabilizing material of National Starch and ChemicalCorporation of Bridgewater, N.J.; and CAPSUL', a modified starch material, which is described in "Product Data: Bulletin No. 409" of National Starch and Chemical Corporation of Bridgewater, N.J. In the case of a smokeless tobacco product, the solubility to saliva of the powdered form of Vitamin E
releases the active ingredients. In the case of the oily form of Vitamin E, or less soluble forms of Vitamin E, saliva will leach Vitamin E out along with other components of the smokeless tobacco product.
Aside from microencapsulation, use of the common oily form of Vitamin R is only recommended for the present invention where it introduced so as not to soak through the cigarette papers 22, 24, 26 or agglomerate smokeless tobacco. This might be best accomplished by applying the oily form of Vitamin E to the tobacco leaves shortly after harvesting. As
the tobacco leaves are than taken through their various drying stages the oily form of Vitamin E will have a tendency to soak into the tobacco leaves and thereby be less likely to migrate. This process might be aided through the addition of other suitable carriers or oil drying chemicals. As
previously noted, though, the common oily, viscous form of vitamin S will have a tendency to interact with tobacco and other natural ingredients in a way that may detrimentally affect the stability of the vitamin E.

EXAMPLE l
A comparison was made between a normal filter-less cigarette and a filter-less cigarette modified to include a substantially pure, dry form of Vitamin E analog. For this comparison, 7.5- grams of CHESTERFIELD® tobacco were removed from a CHESTERFIEL® cigarette and mixed with 0.1 grams of Vitamin E acid succinate. The mixed tobacco blend was formed a filter-less cigarette using a Rizzio auto rolling box. A control cigarette, without Vitamin E analog additive, was also formed using the same Rizal auto rolling box.
When smoked, the control cigarette was found to cause throat and lung irritation for both a smoker and non- smoker. By contrast, the cigarette with Vitamin E acid succinate had the same flavor when smoked but was found to cause no throat or lung irritation for both the smoker and non-smoker.
EXAMPLE 2
A second comparison was made between a normal filtered cigarette, a filtered cigarette with oily Vitamin E injected into the filter and oily vitamin E injected into the length of the tobacco. In this second comparison, the control cigarette was a normal MARLBORO° cigarette. In two separate MARLBORO® cigarettes, oily Vitamin E was taken from a Vitamin E capsule with a syringe and injected into the filter of one cigarette and into the length of the tobacco of the other cigarette.
The three cigarettes where then lit with a butane lighter and three equal, alternating puffs were taken from each cigarette by a non-smoker. The control cigarette was found to irritate the non-smoker's lungs and induce coughing. The cigarette with vitamin E in the filter was found to be less irritating but still induced an unpleasant lung reaction and a slight cough. The cigarette with Vitamin E along the length of the tobacco yielded no irritation. Moreover, the flavor of the Vitamin E tobacco cigarette gave the impression of having been enhanced.

EXAMPLE2
A third comparison was made between a normal wad of smokeless tobacco and a wad of smokeless tobacco modified to include a substantially pure, „dry, form of vitamin E analog.
For this comparison, 1.0 cram of unmodified MAL® long cum smokeless tobacco was first placed in the mouth of a non-tobacco chewer between the cheek and gum. This unmodified smokeless tobacco produced a pleasant flavor but also a simultaneous burning sensation in the mouth, throat and esophagus which, along with an induced cough, forced the non-tobacco chewer to spit out the unmodified smokeless tobacco, to clear the burning sensation from his mouth, the non-tobacco chewer washed his mouth out with water. Nonetheless, the
burning sensation persisted.in the mouth and throat for over 5 minutes after the initial washing.
Approximately four hours later, long enough to ensure the sensitivity and the burning sensation had completely subsided, the non-tobacco chewer than mixed 0.1 grams of `Vitamin E acid succinate obtained from the Eastman Chemical Corporation of Kingsport, Tennessee with 10.0 grams of SKOAL® long cut smokeless tobacco. A 1.0 gram wad of this Vitamin E modified smokeless tobacco was then plated in the mouth of the non-tobacco chewer between the cheek and gum.
Like the unmodified chewing tobacco, this Vitamin E modified chewing tobacco produced a similar pleasant flavor.
Nonetheless, unlike the unmodified smokeless tobacco, the Vitamin E modified smokeless tobacco was completely non-irritating.
In the foregoing specification, the invention has been described with reference to specific preferred embodiments and methods. It will, however, be evident to those of skill in the art that various modifications and changes may be made without departing from the broader spirit
and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims. For example, the Vitamin E compounds of the present invention can be used not Only in cigarettes but also in other tobacco products such as cigars or pipe tobacco as well as tobacco-less smoking products (e.g., cannabis cigarettes).
Like the cigarette applications which have been previously discussed, Vitamin E compounds could advantageously be mixed with cigar tobacco, pipe tobacco, smokeless tobacco or
tobacco-less smoking and tobacco-less smokeless is products during the manufacturing process. Alternatively, in the case of pipe tobacco, it could be mixed with the tobacco by the consumer before the tobacco mixture is loaded into a pipe. In the same manner, the consumer could add it to smokeless ‘tobacco. For these reasons, the specification and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative, rather than restrictive, sense; the invention being limited only by the appended claims.
 

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A tobacco product 'incorporating between 0.1% and 20. 0% by weight of a substantially pure additive from the group consigning of tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
2. The tobacco product of claim 1 in which said additive is selected from the group consisting of alpha tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
3. The tobacco product of claim 1 in which said additive is selected from the group consisting of d-alpha tocouharol, d-alpha-tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alphatocopheryl acetate, mixed tocopherols and dl-alpha-tocopherol.

4. The tobacco product of claim 1 in which said additive is d-alpha-tocopheryl-acid succinate.
5. The tobacco product of claim 1 wherein said tobacco product is a smoke10.ms tobacco product.
6. A tobacco product incorporating a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of dry powdered forms of tocopherol, its analogs or derivatives thereof.

7. The tobacco product of claim 6 wherein said additive is selected from the group consisting of d-alpha tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate spray dried onto a suitable carrier, mixed tocopherols spray dried onto a suitable carrier and- di-alpha-tocopharol spray dried
onto a suitable carrier.
8. The tobacco product of claim 7 wherein said tobacco product is smokeless tobacco.

9. A smokeless tobacco product incorporating between 0.1% and 20.0% by weight of a non-complexes additive whose sole anti-oxidant is selected from the group consisting of dry, powdered tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
10. A smokeless tobacco product incorporating between 0.1% and 20% by weight of en additive selected from the group of dry, powdered tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof which is substantially free of low molecular weight alcohols, other vitamins, eukaryotic cell cultures reacted or complexes with natural substances of plant origin having anti-mutagenic and aromatizing properties.
11. A method of making a more healthy smokeless tobacco product comprising the steps of mixing a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of tocopherols. Their analogs and derivatives thereof with tobacco.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein said additive is in a dry powdered form of tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives.

13. The method of claim 12 wherein said dry powdered form of additive is selected from the group consisting of d-e2phe-tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alphatocopheryl acetate spray dried onto a suitable carrier, mixed tocopherols spray .dried onto a suitable carrier and dl-alpha-
tocophexpl spray dried onto a suitable carrier.
14. The method of claim 13 wherein said additive is d-a2pha-tocopheryl acid succinate.

15. A .smokeable or smokeless non-tobacco product incorporating between 0.1k and 20.0% by weight of a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of tocopherols, their analogs and ‘derivatives thereof.
16. The smokeable or smokeless non-tobacco product of claim 15 wherein said product •is cannabis.
 
17. A tobacco cigarette incorporating between 0.1 and 5000 milligrams of a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
18. The tobacco cigarettes of claim 17 in which said additive is selected from the group consisting of alpha tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
19. The tobacco cigarette of claim 17 in which said additive is selected from the group consisting of d-alpha- d-alpha-tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, mixed tocopherols and c12-alphaLtocopherol.
20. The tobacco cigarette of claim 17 in which said additive is d-alpha-tocopheryl acid succinate.
21. The tobacco cigarette of claim 17 in which said additive is microencapsulated.
22. A tobacco cigarette incorporating a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of dry powdered forms of tocopherol, its analogs or derivatives thereof.
23. The tobacco cigarette of claim 20 wherein said additive is selected from the group consisting of d-alpha- tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate spray dried onto a suitable carrier, mixed tocopherols spray dried onto a suitable carrier and dl-alpha-tocopherol spry dried
onto a suitable carrier.
24. The Tabaco cigarette of claim 23 wherein said suitable carrier is gum acacia.
25. The tobacco cigarette of claim 23 wherein said suitable carrier is gelatin.
26. The tobacco cigarette of claim 22 wherein the said additive is d-alpha-tocopharyl acid succinate.
 
27. The tobacco cigarette of claim wherein said additive is mixed with the cigarette tobacco.
28. The tobacco cigarette of claim 22 wherein said additive is incorporated into a cigarette filter.
29. A tobacco cigarette, wherein a substantially pure additive of d-alpha-cocopheryl acid succinate is mixed with the cigarette tobacco.
30. A tobacco cigarette incorporating between 0.1 and 5000 milligrams of a non-complexes additive whose sole anti-oxidant is selected from the- group consisting of dry, powdered tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.
31. A tobacco cigarette incorporating between 0.1 and 5000 milligrams of an additive selected from the group of dry, powdered tocopherois, their analogs and derivatives thereof which is substantially free of alcohols, other vitamins, eukaryotic cell cultures and natural substances of plant origin having anti-mutagenic and aromatizing properties.
32. A method of making a healthier cigarette comprising the steps of mixing a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof with cigarette tobacco; rolling said mixture into a cigarette using cigarette wrapping paper.
33. The method of claim 32 wherein said additive is in a dry powdered form,
34. The method of claim 33 wherein said dry powdered form of additive is selected from the group consisting of d-alpha-tocopheryl acid succinate, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate spray dried onto a .suitable carrier, mixed tocopherols spray dried onto a suitable carrier and di-alpha tocopherol spray dried onto a suitable carrier.
35. The method of claim 32 wherein said additive is d-alpha-tocopheryl said succinate.
36. The method of claim 82 wherein said additive is a microencapsulated oily form of d-alpha-tocopherol.
37. A cigarette constructed using the method of claim 32
38. A smoka-ble product incorporating between 0.1and 5000 milligrams of a substantially pure additive from the group consisting of tocopherols, their analogs and derivatives thereof.

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